Normal Benchmarks of Your Child’s Development

  • Children should say vowels sounds correctly
  • The following consonant sounds should be said correctly: /p/, /m/, /h/, /k/, /g/, /t/, /d/, /w/, /f/, and /n/.
  • Speech is clear 50-60% of the time to people outside the family, though sound errors still may be there.
  • A child’s verbal vocabulary increases to around 300 words.
  • Should be saying 3-4word sentences
  • Should follow one-step commands
  • Should be beginning to understand numbers like “one” (Give me one block)
  • Understand around 400 words
  • Should say his/her name when asked
  • A child will understand words more than he/she will be able to say
  • A child understands long and complex sentences (“When we go to the park, we will play on the swings.”)
  • A child uses past tenses (-ed), plurals (-s), and pronouns (names of people)
  • Speech is clear 75% of the time to people outside the family, though sound errors still may be there
  • A child may use unnecessary sounds such as “ah” or “umm” in his/her speech.  A child may have dysfluencies and repeat sounds, syllables, words or phrases without a lot of effort.  Children may or may not go through this stage.  Know that this is a normal part of development as long as the child does not struggle to say the words.
  • A child listens and can be reasoned with
  • A child should be beginning to say /l/ and /s/ sounds between 3-4 years of age
  • A child is able to categorize pictures of objects, understands describing words, identifies colors and is able to make simple inferences
  • A child follows 3-step oral directions in sequence
  • Understands WH-questions
  • Remembers events from yesterday
  • Able to repeat nursery rhymes
  • Able to name objects as “same” or “different”
  • Can recall and say two things from a short story after hearing it
  • Able to repeat 5-7 syllable sentences
  • Beginning to correctly say sh, ch, v. j, and z sounds.
  • Speech is clear 90% of the time to people outside the family, though errors of speech sounds may still be there
  • Understands spatial concepts (under, over, in, out, next to) (prepositions)
  • Understands amounts (big, little, more, less, a lot) and numbers, he/she should count to at least 5.
  • A child tries new words, can give the meaning of age-appropriate vocabulary words, and can put together simple sentences given words
  • Seeks out new information through what, why and how questions
  • Able to explain the rules of activity or game
  • Can tell apart left/right on himself/herself
  • Understands time/sequence concepts
  • Knows his/her address and telephone number
  • Can identify money
  • Can correctly say /th/ and /r/ sounds.  Articulation is developed
  • Understands simple math
  • Child has formal language and is continuously expanding